Amora Madura
Amora Madura
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annavonsyfert:

heck yea I did
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schoolfact:

following back tons♡
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catmota:

El Grito II  (1983)
Oswaldo Guayasamin
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deaupeassmango:

smoke-me-up:

bobsavage:

Capitalism.

I kind of want to cry

omg
deaupeassmango:

smoke-me-up:

bobsavage:

Capitalism.

I kind of want to cry

omg
deaupeassmango:

smoke-me-up:

bobsavage:

Capitalism.

I kind of want to cry

omg
deaupeassmango:

smoke-me-up:

bobsavage:

Capitalism.

I kind of want to cry

omg
deaupeassmango:

smoke-me-up:

bobsavage:

Capitalism.

I kind of want to cry

omg
deaupeassmango:

smoke-me-up:

bobsavage:

Capitalism.

I kind of want to cry

omg
deaupeassmango:

smoke-me-up:

bobsavage:

Capitalism.

I kind of want to cry

omg
deaupeassmango:

smoke-me-up:

bobsavage:

Capitalism.

I kind of want to cry

omg
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transparentoctopus:

Mt Vesuvius before and after eruption 19th c
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everybodyisabigcake:

Tumblr en We Heart It.
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bbook:

What makes Paris, Texas and all of Wim’s work so special is that it is filled with so much yearning and so much restlessness; people aching so badly to find what it is they’re looking for. They’re all so hungry for love and connection and something to make them feel alive. Some of them find it in others and then some of them realize even if they did—would it even make them feel better? Or are they destined to eternally feel that hole inside? Travis leaves Jane and Hunter in the end because he knows putting together the pieces of the past won’t put him back together. He’s ripped apart we’ll never know why. None of us do. Wenders’s also expressed that, “hotels room have a real magic because you feel yourself, who you are in a different way and in an anonymous hotel room than you would ever be able to at home.” His films all live in transient places like motels where everyone’s face changes from moment to moment—and in a way that’s more comforting than feeling sorrow in the comfort of stability. In the end, Travis isn’t escaping (as he and Jane once dreamed of doing), he’s relieving—finally freeing himself.
Cinematic Panic: Longing Endlessly With Wim Wenders’ ‘Paris, Texas’
bbook:

What makes Paris, Texas and all of Wim’s work so special is that it is filled with so much yearning and so much restlessness; people aching so badly to find what it is they’re looking for. They’re all so hungry for love and connection and something to make them feel alive. Some of them find it in others and then some of them realize even if they did—would it even make them feel better? Or are they destined to eternally feel that hole inside? Travis leaves Jane and Hunter in the end because he knows putting together the pieces of the past won’t put him back together. He’s ripped apart we’ll never know why. None of us do. Wenders’s also expressed that, “hotels room have a real magic because you feel yourself, who you are in a different way and in an anonymous hotel room than you would ever be able to at home.” His films all live in transient places like motels where everyone’s face changes from moment to moment—and in a way that’s more comforting than feeling sorrow in the comfort of stability. In the end, Travis isn’t escaping (as he and Jane once dreamed of doing), he’s relieving—finally freeing himself.
Cinematic Panic: Longing Endlessly With Wim Wenders’ ‘Paris, Texas’
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